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Sara Weaver at the Biological Interest Group – Monday 2nd November, 1-2pm, Byrne House

October 27, 2015 Leave a comment

Dear all,

You are invited to the next meeting of the Biological Interest Group. It will take place this coming Monday 2nd of November. It will be held in the seminar room at Byrne House, from 1-2pm. Participants can bring lunch and drinks if they wish.
Next week we are very pleased to receive the visit of Sara Weaver, visiting from Waterloo, Canada. We will be discussing the attached paper ‘Bringing Feminism and Evolutionary Science Together: Two Approaches’. Sara kindly provided us with an abstract of her paper, and with more information on how we can help.

Abstract: “While discussions about bringing feminism and evolutionary science together are old, talk of this has gained recent popularity in some quite unexpected circles. Most intriguingly, talk of incorporating feminism with evolutionary research has taken quite a firm hold in evolutionary psychology, a discipline that is in fact quite infamous for conducting prejudicial research. This paper will address the nature and potential for success of these discussions, with a particular interest in what’s being talked about in evolutionary psychology. In the first part of this paper I tease out what I take to be the two dominant approaches to the incorporation of feminism with evolutionary research: (1) the amalgamationist approach and (2) the integrationist approach. The amalgamationist approach, I suggest, is an approach taken by those who propose that the best way to incorporate feminism with evolutionary theory is for “feminist” (i.e., those feminist theories from areas more classically affiliated with feminism such as feminist philosophy and feminist psychology) and evolutionary theories to be combined to create a kind of super theory about feminist-relevant human behaviour. The integrationist approach, on the other hand, is characteristic of those who bring feminism and evolutionary research together in an indirect manner. For example, evolutionary scientists who integrate feminism with their research apply feminist theories, methods, and values where they see fit. In the second part of this paper I argue that the amalgamationist approach as it is laid out by the almalgamationists will inevitably fail. I then discuss why the integrationist approach is the most promising out of the two approaches, and why evolutionary psychologists, in particular, are better off to adopt this approach in their incorporation of feminism with evolutionary science.”

Help: “I would really appreciate suggestions on the following. (1) I’m not altogether sure where I should submit this paper; (2) I’m wondering if the paper needs more of a positive project; (3) the paper is quite short, so suggestions on where I could add to it would be great; (4) as always, what can I do to make this paper tighter, more convincing or sophisticated?”

Please contact Thomas Bonnin (tb391 [at] exeter.ac.uk) if you wish to join the group or for any other information.for any other information.
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Paul Brassley at the Biological Interest Group – Monday 19th October, 1-2pm, Byrne House

October 12, 2015 Leave a comment

Dear all,

You are invited to next week’s meeting of the Biological Interest Group (BIG). It will take place this coming Monday 19th of October. It will be held in the seminar room at Byrne House, from 1-2pm. Participants can bring lunch and drinks if they wish.

Next week we are very pleased to receive the visit of Paul Brassley, from Politics. We will be discussing the paper ”Living in a Sea of Information’: Knowledge Networks in UK Agriculture, 1940-85′. Paul kindly provided us with a summary of this work :

‘As you will see, the paper traces the history of the knowledge network in UK agriculture from about 1940 to 1985 (the reason for this period is explained in the paper) and also attempts to analyse it. It is therefore rather more empirical and less theoretical than the previous paper discussed in BIG this term, but there is some theory towards the end for those who persist. It has been produced for a collection of essays on knowledge networks in agriculture across Europe (mainly western Europe) since about 1700, currently being edited by Leen Van Molle and Yves Segers at Leuven University. It began as a fairly long piece and has lengthened further in response to the editors’ initial comments, so those who wish to cut the amount they have to read have the choice of either concentrating on the history (end of p.2 to beginning of p.17) or on the analysis (pp.1-2 and 17-22).’

Please contact Thomas Bonnin (tb391 [at] exeter.ac.uk) if you wish to join the group or for any other information.

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